Sarah Trigg

Studio Building
Studio Interior
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Studio Location
Artwork
Crack in the Edge of the World, 2010, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 60 inches
Nothing is Permanent, 2010, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 60 inches
Super Indigenous Terrestrial, 2010, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 72 inches
Odyssey, 2010, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 72 inches
Sketch for a New Galaxy, 2010, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 60 inches
Sarah
Trigg
Artist's Statement

My current painting series--Shape of a New Continent--is a shift in my practice into full abstraction. The language developed by collecting, over the course of three years, photos of collective markings as research for my previous series Daily Markings on the Face of the Earth. I define the term--collective markings--as marks on the earth that visibly map the culminations of sociopolitical and economic activity.
In my current work, an internal world is represented as having geological structure and undergoing metabolic shifts. To apply the paint, I often use gravity to pull the medium across the canvas. Exploring this new direction, I researched quotes on gravity—a force of nature easily measurable but its reason for existence still unexplained. A selection of what I found is posted on my website: http://sarahtrigg.com/statement.html.

Bio/Resume

Sarah Trigg’s work has been exhibited in New York and across the U.S., including at the Neuberger Museum of Art, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, and the Weatherspoon Art Museum. New York exhibitions have included Frederieke Taylor Gallery, Pierogi 2000, Smack Mellon, and Jeff Bailey--and an upcoming show at Stephan Stoyanov Gallery. Featured in a solo exhibition at Sara Nightingale Gallery and at ADA Gallery, her 2007-2009 painting series Daily Markings on the Face of the Earth and essay were recently published in the international journal Cultural Politics. The series was also part of the book The Map as Art, printed by Princeton Architectural Press. Later this year, her current painting series—Shape of a New Continent—will be the subject of an essay by John Armitage in the upcoming book Virilio Now: Current Perspectives in Virilio Studies.