Mark Street

Studio Building
Studio Interior
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Studio Location
Artwork
transparency still, from Vera Drake, Drowning
transparency still, from Vera Drake, Drowning
transparency still, from Vera Drake, Drowning
transparency still, from Vera Drake, Drowning
transparency still, from Vera Drake, Drowning
Mark
Street
Artist's Statement

VERA DRAKE, DROWNING is an installation of transparencies made from stills of a 35mm theatrical trailer for a Mike Leigh movie found in the trash outside my local theatre. I buried the film for two years in the garden behind my studio, and the result is the original photographic image worn away by the elements.

The ten transparencies (each11x17) will be hung from a wire in front of a series of diffused fluorescent bulbs. The gallery space will be painted black, so that the images, backlit by the individual bulbs, will float in the space. As a viewer moves from image to image an alternate filmic narrative can be reconstructed from the disparate stills culled from the larger sweep of the film. In the corner the theatrical trailer (abstracted by the fact that it had been buried) will play on a monitor, so that a visitor can move back and forth between the truncated, protocinematic version and the 'whole' film.

Bio/Resume

www.markstreetfilms.com

Mark Street graduated from Bard College (B.A, 1986) and the San Francisco Art Institute (MFA 1992). He has shown work in the New York Museum of Modern Art Cineprobe series (1991, 1994), at Anthology Film Archives (1993, 2006, 2009), Millennium (1990,1996), and the San Francisco Cinematheque (1986, 1992, 2009). His work has appeared at the Tribeca (5 times), Sundance, Rotterdam, New York, London, San Francisco, New York Underground, Sarajevo, Viennale, Ourense (Spain), Mill Valley, South by Southwest, and other film festivals.

His work ranges from the abstract (Winterwheat, 1989; Echo Anthem 1992; Fulton Fish Market, 2004, Trailer Trash, 2008) to improvised narrative feature films (At Home and Asea, 2000; Rockaway 2005),