September 11

September 11, 2011–January 9, 2012

The attacks of September 11, 2001 were among the most pictured disasters in history, yet they remain, a decade later, underrepresented in cultural discourse—particularly within the realm of contemporary art. Responding to these conditions, MoMA PS1 curator Peter Eleey brings together more than 70 works by 41 artists—many made prior to 9/11—to explore the attacks' enduring and far-reaching resonance. Eschewing images of the event itself, as well as art made directly in response, the exhibition provides a subjective framework within which to reflect upon the attacks in New York and their aftermath, and explores the ways that they have altered how we see and experience the world in their wake. September 11 will open on the tenth anniversary of the attacks and occupy the entire second floor of the museum, with additional works located elsewhere in the building and in the surrounding neighborhood. The exhibition is accompanied by a 248-page catalog designed by Kloepfer-Ramsey and published by MoMA PS1. In addition to Peter Eleey's curatorial essay, the catalog includes contributions from Alexander Dumbadze and Robert Hullot-Kentor, as well as texts by Alexander Kluge, W. J. T. Mitchell, and Retort.

Featured Artists:
Diane Arbus, Siah Armajani, Fiona Banner, Luis Camnitzer, Janet Cardiff, John Chamberlain, Sarah Charlesworth, Christo, Jem Cohen, Bruce Conner, Jeremy Deller, Thomas Demand, Shannon Ebner, William Eggleston, Harun Farocki, Lara Favaretto, Jane Freilicher, Maureen Gallace, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jens Haaning, Susan Hiller, Roger Hiorns, Thomas Hirschhorn, Alex Katz, Ellsworth Kelly, Barbara Kruger, Mark Lombardi, Mary Lucier, Gordon Matta-Clark, Harold Mendez, Mike Nelson, Cady Noland, Roman Ondák, Yoko Ono and John Lennon, John Pilson, Willem de Rooij, George Segal, Rosemarie Trockel, James Turrell, Stephen Vitiello, and John Williams


  • From top: George Segal. Woman on a Park Bench, 1998.; Roger Hiorns. Untitled. 2008. Atomized passenger aircraft engine. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist; Corvi-Mora, London; Marc Foxx, Los Angeles; and Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam. © 2011 MoMA PS1; photo: Matthew Septimus

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    Janet Cardiff. The Forty Part Motet. 2001. Reworking of "Spem in Alium Nunquam habui"(1575), by Thomas Tallis. 40-track sound recording (14:00 minutes), 40 speakers. Dimensions variable. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder in memory of Rolf Hoffmann. © 2011 MoMA PS1; photo: Matthew Septimus.

  • Willem de Rooij. Index: Riots, Protest, Mourning and Commemoration (as represented in newspapers, January 2000-July 2002) (detail). 2003. 18 framed panels containing newspaper clippings, and an appendix containing captions. Private collection, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. © 2011 MoMA PS1; photo: Matthew Septimus.

  • . 1990. 22 (at ideal height) x 28 x 22 inches (original paper size) (55.9 x 71 x 55.9 cm). Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. Restricted gift of Carlos and Rosa de la Cruz and Bernice and Kenneth Newberger Fund. © 2011 MoMA PS1; photo: Matthew Septimus.

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    From top: Jeremy Deller. Unrealized Project for the Exterior of the Carnegie Museum. 2004-11. Vinyl banner. 90 x 600 inches (228.6 x 1524 cm). Courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown's enterprise, New York; Felix Gonzalez-Torres. "Untitled" (The End). 1990. 22 (at ideal height) x 28 x 22 inches (original paper size) (55.9 x 71 x 55.9 cm). Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. Restricted gift of Carlos and Rosa de la Cruz and Bernice and Kenneth Newberger Fund. © 2011 MoMA PS1; photo: Matthew Septimus.

 

The exhibition is made possible by MoMA's Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation, the Teiger Foundation, and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Generous support is provided by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.

Additional funding is provided by the Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc.

 
September 11:
A Conversation

December 8, 6:30 PM

Peter Eleey, Curator of MoMA PS1 and organizer of September 11, will moderate a conversation at The Museum of Modern Art.

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