Criss Cross: Some Young New Yorkers III

February 7–April 3, 1999

On February 7, 1999, Criss Cross: Some Young New Yorkers III will take over P.S.1’s café, transforming it into a reading room/marketplace/combat zone where visitors are invited to explore the overlap of art, commerce, and entertainment. A collaboration between eight artists’ groups from the New York area, Criss Cross includes a teenage bedroom/performance space; a dressing room/boutique; a sewing workshop; a magazine reading room; a DJ studio/radio outpost; and a coed performance group ready and willing to guide, influence, mollify and pursue the café visitors. Criss Cross also includes live rock and roll, outdoor battle, and good company in the café and throughout the museum.

An investigation of collaborative activity in New York, Criss Cross reflects the climate of the city and of the year 1999: many of the groups included in the exhibition have a focus that is entrepreneurial and commercial while others critique those impulses; and the majority of the artists participating in the exhibition are women whose practice is interactive and broadly multidisciplinary.

Criss Cross includes:

Actress
Between the sheets one will find a working-class, talented, conceptual art band with flashes of wit, charm, and good looks. Actress experiments with instinctive rhythms, natural powers, and are college-educated. Actress’ favorite actress: Gena Rowlands.

FAT magazine
Founded by Josephine Meckseper, FAT magazine is a truly popular art magazine, a mock-tabloid uncontaminated by critspeak or promotional copy. A mixture of crime, sex, and art makes FAT an easy read for the entire family. On view at P.S.1 will be FAT paraphernalia: FAT pantyhose, FAT glitter underwear, imagery from all three issues, x-rated posters, and videos by various FAT-related artists.

On April 3rd, 1999 Josephine Meckseper challenges any or all female magazine editors to fight her in a “New York Gladiators” Dirk Westphal combat in P.S.1’s courtyard; and FAT magazine issues a general challenge to fearless fighters of both sexes to wage all-out battle at P.S.1 (if you are willing to sign a waiver).

The Stand
The Stand, a collaborative work by artists Carissa Rodriguez and Jodi Busby, was first conceived as an urban event in the marketplace of a public park in the Lower East Side neighborhood of New York City. The artists created and inhabited a mobile workshop, hoping to extend the limits of public space to incorporate places for commerce and personal desire. The Stand creates pieces to be worn on the female body, clothing that functions as an agent for new fictions of everyday life in the city, while pioneering a nomadic mode of living.

UP & CO
Spearheaded by founder Uscha Pohl, UP & CO is a collaborative effort that includes:

ART
—an art gallery/project space hosing regular exhibits
—photo, design, visual installations, video, and music collaborations

FASHION
—an in-house fashion collection designed by Ellis Kreuger and Uscha Pohl
—menswear/womenswear, underwear, outerwear, daywear, eveningwear, made to measure

PUBLISHING
VERY Magazine: a quarterly forum for different creative domains internationally. VERY is now in its fifth issue with additional book projects on the way.

UP & CO’s project at P.S.1 this spring includes: Uscha Pohl (concept, installation, film, photo, music), Ellis Kreuger (fashion, installation), Angela Hill (VERY), Hugo Tillman (photo/film), and Scars (music).

WFMU
WFMU is an iconoclastic, listener-supported, free-form radio station reaching all five boroughs of New York City and Northern New Jersey (at 91.1 FM) plus much of New York’s Orange County and the Hudson Valley (at 90.1 FM). The station can also be heard live world-wide via its internet broadcasts. WFMU is radio where just about anything goes. WFMU shuns the concept of one-dimensional narrowcasting practiced by most stations; mixing styles, techniques, media, and manners. WFMU encourages air staff to use the medium creatively and spontaneously, drawing on music, spoken word, live guests, listener telephone participation, and all modern technologies. WFMU thanks DJ Lynn Mullins for coordinating the station’s participation in Criss Cross.

zingmagazine
Under the guise of a “curatorial crossing,” zingmagazine invites curators from various disciplines to create forums of individual and graphic fusion that are representative of divergent areas of particular interest. As a critical interface, zingmagazine aims to act as elixir of exchange, constantly imbued with a sense of energized contrasts. A special section devoted to Criss Cross artists’ projects accompanies the exhibition in the magazine’s spring ‘99 issue.

Off and On-Site Performance in the exhibition:


Sincerely Yours Escorts
Under the management of Johanna Burke, Sincerely Yours Escorts is a group of compassionate, intuitive visual and performing artists trained in the art of conversation and hostmanship to accommodate visitors within the multimedia extravaganza at P.S.1. As an escort service “employed” by P.S.1, Sincerely Yours will make guests at home in the museum space, preparing them for content and focusing importance within various interactive pieces. Sincerely Yours draws from etiquette guides by authors such as Emily Post and Judith Martin, as well as Geisha history, pop psychology texts, and past experience in customer service.
Available to the public 12-6 pm at the February 7th opening and every Saturday during the exhibition.

Standard and Poor
Standard and Poor is the collaborative alias for the work of Dominic McGill and David Henry Brown Jr. A play on the name of Standard and Poors, a corporation that rates the performance of Fortune 500 companies, this alias points out how the words “standard” and “poor” have come to signify “wealth” and “success” in American culture. Standard and Poor presents challenging scenarios to the public as real, combining symbolic and ironic actions that prompt behavioral cues learned via media/consumer culture. The subject of Standard and Poor’s projects is the ambiguous nature of what constitutes happiness in a supersaturated “one size fits all” society, and all of the players who don’t win the game. Standard and Poor’s work is the bastard child of fine art, documentary, and sociological process.
For P.S.1, Standard and Poor will be The Red Carpet Rollers—literally rolling out a red carpet off-site for existing and non-existent celebrities, creating and documenting the reactions of the gathered crowd. Standard and Poor operate the red carpet service as a business venture as well as a strategy in art.

Criss Cross is the third installment of the Some Young New Yorkers series initiated at P.S.1’s reopening last year. Some Young New Yorkers showcases the work of talented emerging artists and lesser-known projects from the New York area. Criss Cross: Some Young New Yorkers III is co-curated by Alanna Heiss and Klaus Biesenbach with assistance from Larissa Harris.

 

Criss Cross: Some Young New Yorkers III is supported in part by a grant from Jerome Foundation.